Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘snowdonia’

For various reasons I haven’t been out much lately so to keep things ticking over here are a few photo’s that I haven’t used on previous posts. There is no theme and they don’t appear in any particular order. I hope you enjoy.

Aber falls from down the valley. 29 May 2008

Rhaeadr bach from a distance. 28 August 2008.

Wild ponies in the hills. 28 August 2008.

Autumn colour near Capel Curig. 24 October 2008.



Patches of autumn sunlight at Llyn Ogwen. 24 october 2008.

Bala steam railway. 20 July 2009.

Trees on the shore of Llyn Tegid. 20 July 2009.

Afon Lledr at Dolwyddelan. 13 May 2008.

The frozen Afon Lledr. 7 January 2009

View across Conwy Bay from Great Orme. 14 october 2008.

Llandudno and the sweeping curve of the bay from Great Orme. 22 Sept 2009.

Monument to commemotate the bard Taliesin at Llyn Geirionydd. 19 July 2009.

Tu hwnt i'r bont (Beyond the bridge), Llanrwst. 20 July 2008.

Reflections on Llyn Crafnant. 10 December 2009.

Llyn Dinas. 16 March 2009.

Llyn Crafnant. 4 June 2008.

Llyn Nantlle Uchaf. 16 March 2009.

Flooded car park and fields beyond, Llanrwst. 19 November 2009.

Flooded fields at Capel Curig. 19 November 2009.

Flooded fields near Llanrwst. 19 November 2009.

Flooded fields near Trefriw. 19 November 2009.

Wind and rain at Llynau Mymbyr. 19 November 2009.

Read Full Post »

Saturday 25th. August dawned bright, with mist hanging over Afon Conwy. The sun quickly burned off the mist and I set off a few miles up the valley to Llanrwst where my days walk was to start.

Y Pont Fawr and Tu Hwnt i'r Bont at Llanrwst, 22 Aug 09.

Y Pont Fawr and Tu Hwnt i'r Bont at Llanrwst, 22 Aug 09.

The bridge across Afon Conwy (Y Bont Fawr) was built in 1636, reputedly by Inigi Jones. The building at the western end of the bridge is Tu Hwnt i’r Bont (beyond the bridge). This cottage was built in 1480 and for a time served as a courthouse for the town. It is now a tea room owned by the National trust.

My walk started just across the road from Tu Hwnt i’r Bont and the first half mile or so took me along the banks of Afon Conwy.

Looking back to Y Bont Fawr and Llanrwst, 22 Aug 09.

Looking back to Y Bont Fawr and Llanrwst, 22 Aug 09.

Afon Conwy looking towards Betws y Coed, 22 Aug 09.

Afon Conwy looking towards Betws y Coed, 22 Aug 09.

After a short walk alongside the river I cut across the fields towards the forest.

Gwydyr forest is on the eastern flank of the Snowdonia National Park. It covers an area of about 17, 915 acres (28 square miles) and has lots of paths, mountain bike trails and horse ridind tracks.

The first mile or so into the forest was pretty steep as the path climbed up away from the valley, but there is a viewpoint part way up where you can sit at a picnic table and have a rest and a drink (and very welcome it was too).

Looking down the Conwy valley from the viewpoint, 22 Aug 09.

Looking down the Conwy valley from the viewpoint, 22 Aug 09.

After a short rest it was back to the climb. More gradual now as I took the main forest track which is much used by mountain bikers.

This wasn’t the path I’d intended to take, but just before I reached the top of the hill I came across Caerdroia. This is a community project carried out by people who live in and around the forest. As it happens they were holding an open day and I was able to get a welcome cup of coffee and a sit down, all for the princely sum of 50p.

A sculpture at Caerdroia, 22 Aug 09.

One of the sculptures in the labrynth, 22 Aug 09.

A giants table and chair in the labrynth, 22 Aug 09.

A giants table and chair in the labrynth, 22 Aug 09.

As you walk around the labrynth you are met by sculptures and strange objects. Today there were story-tellers and lots of other things going on. I wish I could have stayed longer, but I still had a long walk ahead of me. More information about the project can be found here; http://www.golygfagwydyr.org/achievements.php?page=2〈=e

Now though I had to carry on, up the last short part of the climb. I was now heading for Llyn Parc and soon got my first glimpse of the lake hidden deep in the forest valley.

Llyn Parc hidden in a deep forest valley, 22 Aug 09.

Llyn Parc hidden in a deep forest valley, 22 Aug 09.

Llyn Parc is a natural lake, but the southern end was dammed to raise the level for use of a nearby lead mine. The lake lies 664 feet above sea level and covers an area of 22 acres. It’s a long, narrow lake, lying in a “V” shaped valley.

Llyn Parc, 22 Aug 09

Llyn Parc, 22 Aug 09

After a walk along the shore of the lake I followed the stream at the southern end for a short way. This is the outflow which was used by the lead mine, and there are still relics of the mines around the area.

Relics of mines can be seen all over the area, 22 Aug 09.

Relics of mines can be seen all over the area, 22 Aug 09.

Remains of lead mine beside the waterfall, 22 Aug 09.

Remains of lead mine beside the waterfall, 22 Aug 09.

Now I walked along the shore of Llyn Parc, then it was back to climbing up away from the northern end and heading for another small lake and some more ruined mines. Walking along the forest tracks there were signs that autumn is not far away.

Lots of bright red Rowan berries, 22 Aug 09.

Lots of bright red Rowan berries, 22 Aug 09.

Leaves are already starting to change colour, 22 Aug 09.

Leaves are already starting to change colour, 22 Aug 09.

As well as the signs of autumn though, there were also some colourful edges to the forest.

Colour at the forest edge, 22 Aug 09.

Colour at the forest edge, 22 Aug 09.

After a climb and walking around the hillside I then got some great views.

The view of Moel Siabod and the Snowdon range, 22 Aug 09.

The view of Moel Siabod and the Snowdon range, 22 Aug 09.

The view across the forest towards Llyn Crafnant, 22 Aug 09.

The view across the forest towards Llyn Crafnant, 22 Aug 09.

Cloud over the Snowdon horseshoe, 22 Aug 09.

Cloud over the Snowdon horseshoe, 22 Aug 09.

Now I was almost at Llyn Sarnau. This is a small shallow lake with reeds growing along a lot of it. It’s one of the smaller lakes in the area, covering only 3 acres. As I approached it there were dozens of buuterflies flitting around the edge of the forest. Unfortunately they don’y like to stop and pose for photos, so I only managed to catch a quick shot of one. I regret to say that I’m not really up on butterflies so I won’t even try to name this one.

Llyn Sarnau, 22 Aug 09.

Llyn Sarnau, 22 Aug 09.

Butterfly, 22 Aug 09.

Butterfly, 22 Aug 09.


Now it was just a short walk to another derelict mine, the Cyffty.

The derelict Cyffty mine, 22 Aug 09.

The derelict Cyffty mine, 22 Aug 09.

I’m not sure how long a walk it is from Betws y Coed, but the miners who worked here would walk each day from Betws and Llanrwst before a hard days work in this mine. They must have been tired out before they started!

It wasn’t reliable work either. Often it relied on the weather; wet weather could flood the mine and dry spells could mean there was no water to drive the machinery. When they couldn’t work they didn’t get paid, so many of the miners would have small holdings or work on farms too, to help eke out a living.

Downhill now, I set off again. Not too far away is another old lead mine, the Hafna.

The remains of the Hafna mine, 22 Aug 09.

The remains of the Hafna mine, 22 Aug 09.

Part of Hafna mine, 22 Aug 09.

Part of Hafna mine, 22 Aug 09.

After having a look round the remains of the mine I set off again, downhill towards Llanrwst. Before I got back down into the valley though, I took a slight detour to see a lovely little waterfall.

The Grey Mare's Tail, 22 Aug 09.

The Grey Mare's Tail, 22 Aug 09.

This is The Grey Mare’s Tail. It is known in Welsh as Rhaeadr y Parc Mawr, but this name is rarely used. The falls are in a lovely wooded glade at Coed Felin Blwm (Lead Mill Wood). It’s well worth making the 200 yard detour to see it, and it lies in a nature reserve so there are other paths to take too.

The Grey Mare's Tail, 22 Aug 09.

The Grey Mare's Tail, 22 Aug 09.

The Grey Mare's Tail, 22 Aug 09.

The Grey Mare's Tail, 22 Aug 09.

It’s a steep climb back up to the lane after visiting the falls, but from the top I got a good view of the Conwy valley.

Looking down the lush Conwy valley, 22 Aug 09.

Looking down the lush Conwy valley, 22 Aug 09.

And then it was back to Llanrwst and the sort drive home. It had been a long day and I was glad it would only take a few minutes to get home.

Gwydyr forest is just one more place where there is a lot to explore, I’d only seen a small part today. More information about the activities, trails etc. can be found here: http://www.forestry.gov.uk/gwydyrforestpark

It’s one more place for you to visit; great scenery, history and a labyrinth, what more could you ask for?

Read Full Post »

Close to the lovely Rhaeadr du, in the late 18th century an unknown person cut into a rock lines from Thomas Gray’s Alcaic Ode.

The original carving is barely visible now, but next to the rock is a slate tablet with the original Latin verse and an English translation carved into it.

The stone containing original Latin carving.

The stone containing original Latin carving.

The slate tablet containing both Latin and English translation.

The slate tablet containing both Latin and English translation.

The lines from the Ode are so wonderful that I thought that by way of a change I’d reproduce them here, accompanied by some photos taken at and around the falls.

Alcaic Ode  by Thomas Gray.

O thou! the spirit mid these scenes abiding,

Whate’er the name by which thy power be known

Truly no mean divinity presiding

These native streams, these ancient forests own

And here on pathless rock or mountain height,

Rhaeadr du.

Rhaeadr du.

Amid the torrents ever-echoing road

044a

Afon Gamlan, below the falls.



Afon gamlan rushes through the broad-leaved woodland.

Afon Gamlan rushes through the broad-leaved woodland.

The headlong cliff, the woods eternal light

We feel the godhead’s awful presence more

Than if resplendent neath the cedar beam,

By Phidins wrought his golden image rose

If meet the homage of thy votry seem

Grant to my youth – my wearied youth – repose.


For any Latin scholars out there here is the original Latin version, and please don’t blame me for the translation. I am most definitely not a scholar of the classics.

O tui, severi religio loci,

Quocunque gaudes nomine non leve

Nativa nam certe fluenta

Numen habet veteresque silums,

Presentiorum et conspicimus Deum

Rhaeadr du.

Rhaeadr du.

Per invias rupes fera per juga,

Clivosque praeruptos sonantes

Inter aquas, memorumque noctem

Quam si repostus sub trabe citrea

Afon Gamlan

Afon Gamlan

Fulgeret auro el Phidiaca manu

Salve convanti rite fesso et

Da placidam juveni quitem.

Afon Gamlan

Afon Gamlan

This is a lovely wooded valley which is maintained by the National Trust. Not only did it inspire the unknown person to engrave the melancholic ode, but it also inspired artists such as Turner and Gainsborough.

Visit it yourself and be inspired.



Read Full Post »

Coed y Brenin (The King’s forest) covers 9,000 acres lying within the Snowdonia National Park.

Originally it was part of the Nannau Estate, then became the Vaughan Forest. It became Coed y Brenin in 1935 to celebrate the silver jubilee of king George 5th.

There is forest, open heath land, rivers and waterfalls here, with plenty of wildlife. If you’re lucky you may see Fallow deer in some of the clearings, and there are lots of woodland birds. You will also probably see disused mine buildings, copper and iron were mined here, as well as gold. Coed y Brenin gold has been used for making rings for the royal family.

The wonderful eco-friendly visitor centre is a good place to start.

Coed y Brenin visitor centre, 15 July 09.

Coed y Brenin visitor centre, 15 July 09.

There’s lots of car parking space here, and the centre has a cafe, information desk, mountain bike shop and toilets. There is a verandah to sit out on, childrens play area, and lots of trails start here too.

All the trails are well way-marked, and are graded too. There are tracks for walking, mountain biking and running. There are some especially for wheelchairs too.

Afon Eden runs through the forest close to the visitor centre. There is a short, easy path which leads you down to the river and alongside it.

Afon Eden, 15 July 09.

Afon Eden, 15 July 09.

This trail is only about a mile long, and is suitable for wheelchairs. There is a picnic site close to the river, and some lovely scenery.

Picnic site beside Afon Eden, 15 July 09.

Picnic site beside Afon Eden, 15 July 09.

The path way-marked in red leads to the two wonderful waterfalls. This path is classified as “strenuous”, and I have to agree with that. It has some steep ascents, some using rough paths. It is still a great walk however.

One of the paths on the red route, 9 July 09.

One of the paths on the red route, 9 July 09.

Ling in flower beside a path, 9 July 09.

Ling in flower beside a path, 9 July 09.

On the path up through the dense conifers look out for the Wood ants. You may see the nests before the ants…..they keep adding to them and some are huge.

A wood ants nest, 9 July 09.

A wood ants nest, 9 July 09.

Ants using an old branch as a road back to the nest, 9 July 09.

Ants using an old branch as a road back to the nest, 9 July 09.

If you prefer a less strenuous walk to the waterfalls there is an easier route starting from Tyddyn Gwladys, near Ganllwyd. This route has fewer ascents, following Afon Mawddach and then the Gain up to the two falls. As you follow the path alongside the river you pass a small row of cottages. Mostyn cottages were originally built for workers from the mines.

Just a little further along is Ferndale. This was once workshops and a blasting plant for the mines but is now a small holiday complex.

Ferndale, 15 July 09.

Ferndale, 15 July 09.

And then it’s onwards, following the river, and it’s not too long before you hear the roar of the falls.

Pistyll Cain, 15 July 09.

Pistyll Cain, 15 July 09.

The first view of Pistyll Cain (Cains waterspout) is from a small bridge over Afon Gain.

Pistyll Cain, 15 July 09.

Pistyll Cain, 15 July 09.

Pistyll Cain, 15 July 09.

Pistyll Cain, 15 July 09.

There is a rough, narrow path to get closer to the falls, but be careful, some of the stones get slippery when wet. It’s an impressive cascade though, splashing 148 ft against the black rocks and into the pool below. We’ve been having some heavy showers during the last week or so which has filled up the rivers. When I was here a week ago the falls looked like this.

Pistyll Cain, 9 July 09.

Pistyll Cain, 9 July 09.

Just a few yards from Pistyll Cain, by some ruined mine workings is Rhaeadr Mawddach. Maybe not quite as graceful but you can hear the thunder of the torrent before you see the falls.

Rhaeadr Mawddach 5, 15 July 09.

RRhaeadr Mawddach, 15 July 09.

RRhaeadr Mawddach, 15 July 09.

Rhaeadr Mawddach 4, 15 July 09.

Rhaeadr mawddach, 15 July 09.

Rhaeadr Mawddach, 15 July 09.

Rhaeadr Mawddach, 15 July 09.

Once again the heavy showers of the last few days had made a big difference. This was the falls last week, but however much water is pouring over them they are still worth seeing.

Rhaeadr Mawddach, 9 July 09.

Rhaeadr Mawddach, 9 July 09.

There are disused mine workings all over the forest, like this one near the falls.

Disused mine workings at Rhaeadr Mawddach, 9 July 09.

Disused mine workings at Rhaeadr Mawddach, 9 July 09.

If you fancy a bit of a climb you can go up and see the old Gwyfynydd mine, the last of the gold mines to close. It’s not a long walk up to the mine, but I’m moving on up above the falls and then back down river.

Afon mawddach above the falls, 15 July 09.

Afon mawddach above the falls, 15 July 09.

Afon Gain joins the Mawddach, 15 July 09.

Afon Gain joins the Mawddach just below the falls, 15 July 09.

View from a glade, 9 July 09.

View from a glade, 9 July 09.

Near the village of Ganllwyd another river, the Gamlan meets the Mawddach. Although the rivers meet in the forest, Afon Gamlan is not in Coed y Brenin, so I’m cheating a little here, but it’s worth it.

Afon Gamlan joins the Mawddach, 15 July 09.

Afon Gamlan joins the Mawddach, 15 July 09.

You follow Afon gamlan towards the village, then cross the A470 next to the memorial hall. A path then leads up to the hillside to Rhaeadr du (Black falls).

Rhaeadr Ddu, 15 July 09.

Rhaeadr du, 15 July 09.

These lovely little falls inspired artists such as Turner and Gainsborough.

Rhaeadr du, 15 July 09.

Rhaeadr du, 15 July 09.

A stone stands near the falls, on which, during the late 18th century an unknown person carved lines from Thomas Gray’s Alcaic Ode, in latin.

Carved stone near Rhaeadr du, 15 July 09.

Carved stone near Rhaeadr du, 15 July 09.

The original Latin along with translation. 15 July 09.

The original Latin along with translation. 15 July 09.

From here the Gamlan thunders over rocks as it rushes down the steep valley to join the Mawddach.

Afon Gamlan, 15 July 09.

Afon Gamlan, 15 July 09.

Afon Gamlan, 15 July 09.

Afon Gamlan, 15 July 09.

Afon Gamlan, 15 July 09.

Afon Gamlan, 15 July 09.

There are some lovely walks around rhaeadr du and further up (including more disused mines), but now I’m heading back to Coed y Brenin visitor centre for a cup of coffee, and maybe a stroll through the woodland afterwards.

A path through woodland in Coed y Brenin, 15 July 09.

A path through woodland in Coed y Brenin, 15 July 09.

There is so much to see and do around Coed y Brenin. One visit is just not enough. Give it a try, you’ll love it.

Have a look at the Forestry Commission website too. There’s a good little video on there. http://www.forestry.gov.uk/website/recreation.nsf/LUWebDocsByKey/WalesGwyneddNoForestCoedyBreninCoedyBreninVisitorCentre





Read Full Post »

You can’t live in north Wales (and blog about it) without mentioning Snowdon, so after about 11 months of this blog I thought I’d better put that right.

Tuesday 24th June dawned bright and sunny, so I made an early start. Up the valley to Betws y Coed and then up the Llugwy valley to Capel Curig. Just after passing through the village you come to Llynau Mymbyr, and this is where you get your first view of the famous Snowdon horseshoe.

First view of the Snowdon horseshoe.

First view of the Snowdon horseshoe. 24 June 09.

Then it was onwards, over the Llanberis pass, down into the valley and onto the village of Llanberis.

There are 3 main paths up to the summit of Snowdon. The Llanberis path, unsurprisingly starts at Llanberis, close to the Snowdon mountain railway station. It starts along a narrow road, soon becoming steep as you turn onto a stony path. The first third of the walk is steep, but very soon there is wonderful scenery all around. looking back you get a wonderful view of the village and Llyn Padarn.

Llanberis and Llyn Padarn.

Llanberis and Llyn Padarn. 24 June 09.

Climbing a little higher you can look back and see the huge slate quarries cut into the hillside above the valley.

Llanberis valley and the huge slate quarries.

Llanberis valley and the huge slate quarries. 24 June 09.

Halfway up is the Halfway cafe where you can stop for refreshments. It used to be a wooden hut but that was blown down in a gale a few years ago. It’s now a more substantial building.

As you continue your walk you’ll probably see the steam trains chugging their way up some of the steep inclines. The railway was built in 1896, more wonderful Victorian engineering.

The train makes it's way slowly up an incline.

The train makes it's way slowly up an incline. 24 June 09

The path continues upwards, getting steeper agin for the last third. It’s a rocky path and good footwear should be worn. Many people have accidents and twist their ankles every year because they wear trainers or sandals.

The path with Clogwyn Coch in the background.

The path with Clogwyn Coch in the background. 24 June 09.

I should add here that I’m no expert, so feel free to correct any mistakes I make with names etc.

The path continues to climb, up to where the Pyg path and Miners path meet it. These two paths start at Pen-y-Pass. One running alongside Llyn Llydaw and the Pyg path running below the ridge of Crib Goch.

The path to Pen-y-Pass. 24 June 09.

The path to Pen-y-Pass. 24 June 09.

Crib Coch means “Red comb”. The ridges leading to it are knife edge, with steep drops on either side. This is not a walk for beginners, even in good weather, and in bad weather even experience climbers need good equipment. The peak of Crib Goch is 923 metres (3, 028 feet).

Crib Goch showing the Pyg and Miners tracks. 24 June 09.
Crib Goch showing the Pyg and Miners tracks. 24 June 09.

Llyn Llyddaw lies in a bowl between Crib Goch and Y Lliwedd.

018

From here the path gets even steeper as it heads for the summit of Snowdon.

The last push up to the summit.

The last push up to the summit.

Yr Wyddfa means “the tumulus”. Legend has it that a giant called Rhita Gawr who lived here killed kings and used their beards to make cloaks to keep himself warm. Eventually though he come up against King Arthur, who killed him. Everyone then placed rocks over his body to form the summit.

Onwards and upwards, and after the last steep climb the new visitor centre comes into view.

Hafon Eryri. 24 June 09.

Hafod Eryri. 24 June 09.

Hafod (summer residence) Eryri (Snowdonia) was opened in early June 2009. It was about a year late in opening, but the workers had to suffer some atrocious conditions.

It is built of local granite and the inside is lined with local Oak. It has to withstand winds up to 150 mph, about 200 inches of rain per year and temperatures of -20 deg C.

It’s a wonderful building, blending in with it’s surroundings and the wall of glass at the front gives fantastic views.

The view from Hafod Eryri. 24 June 09.

The view from Hafod Eryri. 24 June 09.

Prince Charles famously called the old building, “the highest slum in Britain”. Well Hafod Eryri is certainly not a slum, it’s a wonderful building, and everyone concerned should be congratulated.

Out through the back door, and it’s a few more steps up to the actual summit.

The summit of Snowdon. 24 June 09

The summit of Snowdon. 24 June 09

Snowdon is the highest mountain in England and Wales, standing at 1,085 metres (3,560 feet). Down in the valley it was over 20 deg C, but up here there was a strong, cool wind. The weather can change in minutes up here but I was lucky, it was a gorgeous sunny (warm lower down) day.

Y Lliwedd is is the other peak which makes up the famous Snowdon horseshoe, and stands at 902 metres (2, 595 feet).

Y Lliwedd from near the summit of Snowdon. 24 June 09.

Y Lliwedd from near the summit of Snowdon. 24 June 09.

This had been a wonderful day. History, fantastic scenery and great weather. Tiring but wonderful. I’ll end this post with a few miscellaneous photos, and invite you to visit Snowdon and experience it first hand.

008010

026057


051056

The train chugs it's way up to the summit, 24 JJune 09

Read Full Post »

Anytime is a good time to visit north Wales.

Last winter was the hardest for many years, but there were some magical views in the valleys and the mountains.

Autumn is full of wonderful colours.

Spring though, has to be my favourite time; as fresh green leaves start to appear on the trees and flowers start to bloom.

There is a limit to how much I can put into one post, but I hope it gives a taster of how wonderful springtime is around north Wales.

Betws y Coed is a favourite place of artists, walkers and climbers. There is a lovely walk along the river banks, and on the day these photos were taken the weather was wonderful.

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

I have already written a post on Llyn Crafnant, on 23 feb 2009, so I won’t go into more detail here. I will say though that Llyn Crafnant is wonderful at any time of the year. This was a lovely spring day with blossom on some of the bushes and trees just starting to come into leaf.

Spring at Llyn Crafnant, 18 April 2009

There is not much to say about this photo. Bluebells mean spring, and they were in profusion this year. The photo was taken near Trefriw in the Conwy valley on 30th. April 2009.

Bluebells in the Conwy valley, 30 Apr 2009

Nant y Coed is a lovely wooded valley near Llanfairfechan. It was once described as “the loveliest sylvan rock and river scenery in Wales”, and I certainly wouldn’t argue with that description.

Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009


Blue bells at Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

Blue bells at Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

A sun-dappled path, 7 May 2009

A sun-dappled path through Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

The Isle of Anglesey is a great place to visit. South Stack, not far from Holyhead is a nature reserve. It’s a place to see Puffins, Razorbills and Guillemots as well as the Chough, which nests here.

Walking through the heathland and farmland along the cliff tops you hear the Skylark singing. Not a common sound these days. These photos were taken on 31st. May 2009.

South Stack, Anglesey, June 2009

Razorbills and Guillemots perch on narrow ledges, 31 May 2009

Razorbills and Guillemots perch on narrow ledges, 31 May 2009

Lots of spring colours, 12 May 2009

Lots of spring colours, 12 May 20

I did a post on Bodnant gardens on 14 May 2009, but with all the spring colours there I had to put a couple of photos here, just to tempt you.

Colours in The Dell, 12 May 2009

Colours in The Dell, 12 May 2009


Fairy Glen is just   outside of Betws y Coed and is well worth a visit.

A walk down into the gorge is a must, and then a walk back up, along the top and then gently down to walk along the Afon Conwy.

The black Zwartble sheep are on the farmland which leads to Fairy Glen.

Fairy Glen, Betws y Coed, 3 May 2009


Zwartbles sheep & lambs, 3 May 2009

Zwartbles sheep & lambs, 3 May 2009


Llandudno’s Victorian Extravaganza is held over 3 days of the May Bank Holiday.

It was a beautiful day on the Saturday this year (the Sunday too, but Monday was not as good) and I ended up getting sunburnt!

I did a post on the Extravaganza on 8 May 2009 so this is just a taster.

Fairground rides on the main shopping street, 2 May 2009

Fairground rides on the main shopping street, 2 May 2009

Canada goose with goslings, Conwy, 29 May 2009

Canada goose with goslings, Conwy, 29 May 2009

Birds are every where during spring. Lots of summer migrants have arrived and everywhere you go you can hear bird song.

Not all our birds are little brown jobs either, we have plenty of colourful ones too.

Stonechat near Aber falls, 28 May 2008

Stonechat near Aber falls, 28 May 2008

Chaffinch on Anglesey, 21 May 2008

Chaffinch on Anglesey, 21 May 2008

Greenfinch at Conwy, 29 May 2008

Greenfinch at Conwy, 29 May 2008

Oystercatcher chick at Conwy, 30 May 2008

Oystercatcher chick at Conwy, 30 May 2008

Oystercatcher with a chick, 28 May 2009

Oystercatcher with a chick, 28 May 2009

Aber falls, 29 May 2008

Aber falls, 29 May 2008

Visit the Aber falls, it’s a great day out.

Near the village of Abergwyngregyn, the falls are reached after a gentle walk through pastures and woodland. The valley is now a nature reserve.

It was here that I heard my first Cuckoo of the year, last year.

The fall’s longest single drop is about 115ft.

As it’s spring I thought I’d end with some spring flowers.

Gorse, April 2008

Gorse, April 2008

Wild Primroses on Anglesey, May 21 2008

Wild Primroses on Anglesey, May 21 2008

Bee on a flower, Conwy, 28 May 2008

Bee on a flower, Conwy, 28 May 2008

Common centaury at South Stack

Common centaury at South Stack

Birds foot trefoil, Conwy, 28 May 2008

Birds foot trefoil, Conwy, 28 May 2008

I could have found much more to put in here but that will have to do for now. Why not visit north Wales and do some exploring for yourself.

Read Full Post »

Having been ill all over the holiday period blogging has taken a back seat. Yesterday (7 Jan 2009) I just had to get out, and took off into the hills.

I don’t think the photos I took need any explanation or commentary, so I hope you enjoy them.

Betws y Coed in frost and ice coating.

Betws y Coed in frost and ice coating.

The Llugw valley looking beautiful in winter clothing.

The Llugwy valley looking beautiful in winter clothing.

Frost and ice make the beautiful Llugwy valley even more spectacular.

Frost and ice make the beautiful Llugwy valley even more spectacular.

A frosty scene on the banks of Afon Llugwy
A frosty scene on the banks of Afon Llugwy
The fast-flowing Afon Llugwy is frozen

The fast-flowing Afon Llugwy is frozen

Ice on Afon Llugwy

Ice on Afon Llugwy

Dolwyddelan and Moel Siabod

Dolwyddelan and Moel Siabod

A frosty scene at Dolwyddelan

A frosty scene at Dolwyddelan

The frozen Afon Lledr at Dolwyddelan

The frozen Afon Lledr at Dolwyddelan

The Snowdon range

The Snowdon range

Pen y Benglog

Pen y Benglog

Tryfan

Tryfan

Clogwyn y Tawr

Clogwyn y Tawr

Bochlwyd Buttress

Bochlwyd Buttress

Ice on the fast-flowing stream leaving Llyn Ogwen

Ice on the fast-flowing stream leaving Llyn Ogwen

Ice patterns on Llyn Ogwen

Ice patterns on Llyn Ogwen

A frozen Llyn Ogwen

A frozen Llyn Ogwen


Read Full Post »

Older Posts »