Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘porth dafarch’

I have said previously that north Wales has wonderful scenery. It’s not all about the mountains of Snowdonia, in fact Snowdonia is not all mountains anyway. I thought I’d put together a few images to show just how varied the scenery is in this part of the world.

To start, here is the Conwy valley, looking down from the hills above Trefriw towards Conwy, Llandudno and the sea.

The Conwy valley looking towards the coast. June 2008

The Conwy valley looking towards the coast. June 2008

The first bridge over Afon Conwy, just below it's source. Aug 2008

The first bridge over Afon Conwy, just below it's source. Aug 2008

May 14 2008, Canada geese nr the source of Afon Conwy

Canada geese near the source of Afon Conwy. May 2008.

North Wales has a great coastline, and the small island of Anglesey has great beaches along with wild, rocky cliffs.

The cliffs around Porth Dafarch. June 2008.

The cliffs around Porth Dafarch. June 2008.

The beach and dunes at Lligwy bay. May 2008.

The beach and dunes at Lligwy bay. May 2008.

The little sheltered beach at Porth Dafarch. June 2008.

The little sheltered beach at Porth Dafarch. June 2008.

The sweeping Celmyn bay. June 2009.

The sweeping Celmyn bay. June 2009.

And so back to the mainland.

The crags at the head of Cwm Eigiau rise to over 600m. June 2008

The crags at the head of Cwm Eigiau rise to over 600m. June 2008

Afon Lledr at Dolwyddelan.  May 2008.

Afon Lledr at Dolwyddelan. May 2008.

Snowdon range from below Moel Lechwedd-gwyn. May 2008

Snowdon range from below Moel Lechwedd-gwyn. May 2008

Bala steam railway runs alongside Llyn Tegid. July 2009

Bala steam railway runs alongside Llyn Tegid. July 2009

Llyn Tegid with Bala in the background. 2 Aug 09

Llyn Tegid with Bala in the background. 2 Aug 09

Speaking of Bala…….the national eisteddfod is being held there this week. I went to have a look round on Sunday and spent over 6 hours there. What a great day out it is. Here are a few images.

The pavilion (pafiliwn). Also known as the big pink tent. 2 Aug 09.

The pavilion (pafiliwn). Also known as the big pink tent. 2 Aug 09.

The big pink tent can be seen from all over the site. 2 Aug 09

The big pink tent can be seen from all over the site. 2 Aug 09

A bland playing on stage 1. 2 Aug 09

A band playing on stage 1. 2 Aug 09

A harp workshop getting under way on stage 2. 2 Aug 09

A harp workshop getting under way on stage 2. 2 Aug 09

Maes C is the centre of attraction for younger people. 2 Aug 09

Maes C is the centre of attraction for younger people. 2 Aug 09

The Bards circle (Cylch yr Orsedd) is used for some performances. 2 Aug 09.

The Bards circle (Cylch yr Orsedd) is used for some performances. 2 Aug 09.

The choir of Ysgol y Gader on stage 2. 2 Aug 09

The choir of Ysgol y Gader on stage 2. 2 Aug 09

The bar and food areas get pretty busy. 2 Aug 09

The bar and food areas get pretty busy. 2 Aug 09

A budding harpist attends a workshop. 2 Aug 09

A budding harpist attends a workshop. 2 Aug 09

Pupils of Ysgol y Gader on stage 2. 2 Aug 09

Pupils of Ysgol y Gader on stage 2. 2 Aug 09

A choir on stage in the pavilion. 2 Aug 09

A choir on stage in the pavilion. 2 Aug 09

This was just one of many choirs. They gave a great rendition of Wimoweh (The lion sleeps tonight), in Welsh of course.

Even if you don’t speak Welsh it’s worth visiting, it’s a great day out, particularly if you get good weather. More details can be found at:  http://www.eisteddfod.org.uk/english/

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Most of my posts about North wales have been around Snowdonia, mainly I suppose because I love being in the hills.

I have, however, paid three visits to Anglesey this year, and it has so much to offer. It’s relatively flat, with lots of rolling farmland. Anglesey Beef and Lamb is wonderful! 

But there are lots of great sights, wonderful cliffs, great beaches, good bird-watching and history. Obviously having made three visits I still have much more to see, but I thought it was time I made a start, so here is my first post on Anglesey.

The Menai suspension bridge

The Menai suspension bridge

The Menai Suspension bridge was the first crossing of the Menai Strait, which seperates Anglesey from the rest of North Wales.                                                                  Before the bridge was built anyone wanting to cross had to walk across soft sand to the ferry, and then do the same at the other side! There were also many ferry accidents, the worst being in 1785 when 55 people were swept away.                                                                      Thomas Telford designed the bridge. It had to have 100 feet of clear space under the main span, to allow the tall sailing ships to pass underneath.                                     The 16 massive chains hold up 579 feet of roadway between the two towers. The bridge was opened on 30th January 1826.                                                     

Moelfre

Moelfre

 

Moelfre is a small sleepy village with a pebbled beach and white-washed cottages huddled around the bay. It is well known around the the world for having one of the finest and renowned life boat stations in the world.

Many of the lifeboatmen stationed there have won medals for bravery.

Moelfre

Moelfre

 

 

 

 

Cliffs near Moelfre

Cliffs near Moelfre

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Royal Charter monument.

The Royal Charter monument.

 

 

 

 

On the night of 26th October 1859 a British cutter, The Royal Charter, was on the last leg of it’s long journey from Melbourne to Liverpool.                                            Sailing up the Irish Sea there had been no wind at all, but suddenly a savage storm blew up. The captain tried to get a pilot, but none would go out in such weather. he dropped anchor, but at 1.30am the chain parted, and it was dawn when two locals saw the ship being dashed against the rocks.                                                              The brave men of Moelfre made a human chain out into the breakers, and saved 18 passengers, 5 riggers and 18 crew, but on that day 452 people, including all of the officers lost their lives.                                       This is the monument, paid for by the people of Moelfre in remembrance of that night.

The beach at Lligwy Bay

The beach at Lligwy Bay

 

 

A short walk along the top of the cliffs leads to the sweeping bay of Lligwy, with it’s beautiful beach and sand dunes.

Lligwy Bay

Lligwy Bay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Great Orme from Moelfre

The Great Orme from Moelfre

 

 

 

 

This is the view of the Great Orme from just above the village of Moelfre.

 

Neolithic burial chamber, near Lligwy

Neolithic burial chamber, near Lligwy

 

 

 

A short walk from the beach at Lligwy is this neolithic burial chamber.                                                                 It was probably constructed before 3000BC, and when it was excavated in 1908 it was found to contain the bones of up to 30 men, women and children.                   The people who constructed this tomb had no tools and the wheel had not been invented, but the managed to manoevre this huge capstone, weighing over 25 tons, onto pre-arranged stone slabs around the edge.

Ruined 12th century chapel, Lligwy

Ruined 12th century chapel, Lligwy

 

 

 

Close by is this ruined chapel, built in the 12th century.

 

Part of the ruined 4th century village, Din Lligwy

Part of the ruined 4th century village, Din Lligwy

 

 

Just a few hundred yards away is Din Lligwy, an ancient village hidden in woodland. This is a Celtic settlement dating back to the last years of the Roman Empire in the 4th century AD.

Part of the ruined 4th century village, Din Lligwy

Part of the ruined 4th century village, Din Lligwy

 

 

 

 

 

All of the photos of Moelfre and Lligwy were taken in May 2008.

 

 

The beach at Porth Dafarch

The beach at Porth Dafarch

 


On the opposite side of the island is the lovely little beach at Porth Dafarch.

Sandy coves near Porth Dafarch

Sandy coves near Porth Dafarch

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cliffs around Porth Dafarch

Cliffs around Porth Dafarch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

South Stack lighthouse

South Stack lighthouse

 

 

A little further around the coast is South Stack and it’s lighthouse.                                                                        The cliffs around here are the breeding grounds for many seabirds, including Guillemots, Razorbills and Puffins. Also on these cliffs can be found the wonderful Choughs, members of the Crow family with bright red beaks.

An air-sea rescue helicopter at South Stack

An air-sea rescue helicopter at South Stack

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All of these photos of Porth Dafarch and South Stack were taken in June 2008.

Guillemots and Razorbills

Guillemots and Razorbills

Chough

Chough

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malltraeth Cob Pool

Malltraeth Cob Pool

 

 

Malltraeth Cob Pool is south of South Stack and Porth Dafarch. This is a wonderful place for bird watchers, but there are some lovely walks in the area too.

I spent a couple of hours here and saw lots of ducks and waders, including Pintails, Teal and Little Egrets.

 

 

The Cefni estuary at low tide

The Cefni estuary at low tide

 

 

 

As you walk along the path you have the cob on one side and the cefni estuary on the other, with more ducks, waders and seabirds to see.

 

 

 

Teal roosting

Teal roosting

A flock of Lapwings at Malltraeth

A flock of Lapwings at Malltraeth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Autumn colour at Malltraeth

Autumn colour at Malltraeth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The carneddau hills from across the Menai Staits

The carneddau hills from across the Men

 

 

And so I headed back to the bridge.

The photos around Malltraeth were taken on the 6th November 2008.

 

 

 

I’m sure it won’t be too long before I’m back on Anglesey again, there is so much to see and do.

Read Full Post »