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Posts Tagged ‘Llyn Crafnant’

For various reasons I haven’t been out much lately so to keep things ticking over here are a few photo’s that I haven’t used on previous posts. There is no theme and they don’t appear in any particular order. I hope you enjoy.

Aber falls from down the valley. 29 May 2008

Rhaeadr bach from a distance. 28 August 2008.

Wild ponies in the hills. 28 August 2008.

Autumn colour near Capel Curig. 24 October 2008.



Patches of autumn sunlight at Llyn Ogwen. 24 october 2008.

Bala steam railway. 20 July 2009.

Trees on the shore of Llyn Tegid. 20 July 2009.

Afon Lledr at Dolwyddelan. 13 May 2008.

The frozen Afon Lledr. 7 January 2009

View across Conwy Bay from Great Orme. 14 october 2008.

Llandudno and the sweeping curve of the bay from Great Orme. 22 Sept 2009.

Monument to commemotate the bard Taliesin at Llyn Geirionydd. 19 July 2009.

Tu hwnt i'r bont (Beyond the bridge), Llanrwst. 20 July 2008.

Reflections on Llyn Crafnant. 10 December 2009.

Llyn Dinas. 16 March 2009.

Llyn Crafnant. 4 June 2008.

Llyn Nantlle Uchaf. 16 March 2009.

Flooded car park and fields beyond, Llanrwst. 19 November 2009.

Flooded fields at Capel Curig. 19 November 2009.

Flooded fields near Llanrwst. 19 November 2009.

Flooded fields near Trefriw. 19 November 2009.

Wind and rain at Llynau Mymbyr. 19 November 2009.

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Anytime is a good time to visit north Wales.

Last winter was the hardest for many years, but there were some magical views in the valleys and the mountains.

Autumn is full of wonderful colours.

Spring though, has to be my favourite time; as fresh green leaves start to appear on the trees and flowers start to bloom.

There is a limit to how much I can put into one post, but I hope it gives a taster of how wonderful springtime is around north Wales.

Betws y Coed is a favourite place of artists, walkers and climbers. There is a lovely walk along the river banks, and on the day these photos were taken the weather was wonderful.

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

I have already written a post on Llyn Crafnant, on 23 feb 2009, so I won’t go into more detail here. I will say though that Llyn Crafnant is wonderful at any time of the year. This was a lovely spring day with blossom on some of the bushes and trees just starting to come into leaf.

Spring at Llyn Crafnant, 18 April 2009

There is not much to say about this photo. Bluebells mean spring, and they were in profusion this year. The photo was taken near Trefriw in the Conwy valley on 30th. April 2009.

Bluebells in the Conwy valley, 30 Apr 2009

Nant y Coed is a lovely wooded valley near Llanfairfechan. It was once described as “the loveliest sylvan rock and river scenery in Wales”, and I certainly wouldn’t argue with that description.

Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009


Blue bells at Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

Blue bells at Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

A sun-dappled path, 7 May 2009

A sun-dappled path through Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

The Isle of Anglesey is a great place to visit. South Stack, not far from Holyhead is a nature reserve. It’s a place to see Puffins, Razorbills and Guillemots as well as the Chough, which nests here.

Walking through the heathland and farmland along the cliff tops you hear the Skylark singing. Not a common sound these days. These photos were taken on 31st. May 2009.

South Stack, Anglesey, June 2009

Razorbills and Guillemots perch on narrow ledges, 31 May 2009

Razorbills and Guillemots perch on narrow ledges, 31 May 2009

Lots of spring colours, 12 May 2009

Lots of spring colours, 12 May 20

I did a post on Bodnant gardens on 14 May 2009, but with all the spring colours there I had to put a couple of photos here, just to tempt you.

Colours in The Dell, 12 May 2009

Colours in The Dell, 12 May 2009


Fairy Glen is just   outside of Betws y Coed and is well worth a visit.

A walk down into the gorge is a must, and then a walk back up, along the top and then gently down to walk along the Afon Conwy.

The black Zwartble sheep are on the farmland which leads to Fairy Glen.

Fairy Glen, Betws y Coed, 3 May 2009


Zwartbles sheep & lambs, 3 May 2009

Zwartbles sheep & lambs, 3 May 2009


Llandudno’s Victorian Extravaganza is held over 3 days of the May Bank Holiday.

It was a beautiful day on the Saturday this year (the Sunday too, but Monday was not as good) and I ended up getting sunburnt!

I did a post on the Extravaganza on 8 May 2009 so this is just a taster.

Fairground rides on the main shopping street, 2 May 2009

Fairground rides on the main shopping street, 2 May 2009

Canada goose with goslings, Conwy, 29 May 2009

Canada goose with goslings, Conwy, 29 May 2009

Birds are every where during spring. Lots of summer migrants have arrived and everywhere you go you can hear bird song.

Not all our birds are little brown jobs either, we have plenty of colourful ones too.

Stonechat near Aber falls, 28 May 2008

Stonechat near Aber falls, 28 May 2008

Chaffinch on Anglesey, 21 May 2008

Chaffinch on Anglesey, 21 May 2008

Greenfinch at Conwy, 29 May 2008

Greenfinch at Conwy, 29 May 2008

Oystercatcher chick at Conwy, 30 May 2008

Oystercatcher chick at Conwy, 30 May 2008

Oystercatcher with a chick, 28 May 2009

Oystercatcher with a chick, 28 May 2009

Aber falls, 29 May 2008

Aber falls, 29 May 2008

Visit the Aber falls, it’s a great day out.

Near the village of Abergwyngregyn, the falls are reached after a gentle walk through pastures and woodland. The valley is now a nature reserve.

It was here that I heard my first Cuckoo of the year, last year.

The fall’s longest single drop is about 115ft.

As it’s spring I thought I’d end with some spring flowers.

Gorse, April 2008

Gorse, April 2008

Wild Primroses on Anglesey, May 21 2008

Wild Primroses on Anglesey, May 21 2008

Bee on a flower, Conwy, 28 May 2008

Bee on a flower, Conwy, 28 May 2008

Common centaury at South Stack

Common centaury at South Stack

Birds foot trefoil, Conwy, 28 May 2008

Birds foot trefoil, Conwy, 28 May 2008

I could have found much more to put in here but that will have to do for now. Why not visit north Wales and do some exploring for yourself.

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The lakes of north Wales may not have the size or the fame of the Scottish lochs, but they have fantastic scenery, history and wildlife in abundance. Some are very small, some are reservoirs, but all have something to offer. This is the first of my posts on the lakes of north Wales.

LLYN CRAFNANT is found in a beautiful tranquil valley where the northern edge of the Gwydir forest meets the Carneddau range.

Distant view of Llyn Crafnant

Distant view of Llyn Crafnant


Llyn Crafnant

Llyn Crafnant

The lake is about a mile long and covers 63 acres. A walk around the lake is about 6 kms.

The name derives from the Welsh words for garlic “craf”, and “nant” a stream.

Many people regard Llyn Crafnant as one of the most beautiful spots in north Wales, and it’s easy to see why.

This is certainly one of my favourite places, at any time of the year.

Afon Crafnant flows from the lake and meets Afon Conwy at the village of Trefriw,

Reflections on Llyn Crafnant

Reflections on Llyn Crafnant

Waterfall at the head of Llyn Crafnant

Waterfall near the head of Llyn Crafnant.

Llyn Geirionydd

Llyn Geirionydd

LLYN GEIRIONYDD is a short, steep walk over the hill from Llyn Crafnant. It is almost a mile long and covers about 45 acres.

It is the only lake in Snowdonia designated to permit power boats and water skiing.

Llyn Geirionydd

Llyn Geirionydd

Llyn Geirionydd

Llyn Geirionydd

Afon Geirionydd, the outflow of the lake, flows down a steep gorge which is popular for gorge walking. It was also used to power a now disused woolen mill near Trefriw.

On a small hill overlooking the lake stands the Taliesin  monument.This commemorates the 6th century bard Taliesin, who was the chief bard in the court of at least  three kings.

Obelisk to commemorate the Bard Taliesin

Whilst there is fishing over the hill at Llyn Crafnant, there isn’t here.. Llyn Geirionydd has been poisoned by the lead mines which were found in the surrounding hills, there are no fish here.

Iron sulphate in the lake

Iron sulphate in the lake

Iron sulphate running into Llyn Geirionydd

Iron sulphate running into Llyn Geirionyd


LLYN EIGIAU was a small lake in the hills above Dolgarrog. In 1911 a dam was built, about a mile long and 35 feet high, to supply water for the power station in the village.

The first contractor resigned from the project because of what he said was cost cutting.

Llyn Eigiau

Llyn Eigiau

On 2nd November 1925, following over 20 inches of rain in 5 days, the dam broke.

The torrent of water and debris rushed down the hill and into the the Coedty reservoir, which was also breached.

Millions of gallons of water, and debris, tore down the hillside to the village below, causing the loss of 17 lives.

Llyn Eigiau

Llyn Eigiau

breached dam at Llyn Eigiau

breached dam at Llyn Eigiau

Llyn Eigiau is one of the few lakes in Wales to have it’s own, naturally occuring Brown Trout.

The water level of the lake is now about 14 feet lower than before the dam was breached.

The path of the deluge

The path of the deluge

The crag along Llyn Eigiau and part of the remains of the dam

The crag along Llyn Eigiau and part of the remains of the dam

Coedty reservoir

Coedty reservoir

LLYN LOCKWOOD at Penygwrd is named after the 1920’s hotelier who created it as a fish pond, and to give his visitors a view of a lake.

Llyn Lockwood

Llyn Lockwood

Llyn Lockwood and the Snowdon range

Llyn Lockwood and the view of the Snowdon range.

LLYNAU MYMBYR are two small lakes in the valley running from Capel Curig to Penygwryd.

There was originally one lake, not quite a mile long, but it has almost silted up across the centre, cutting the lake in two.

It is from here that many visitors get their first view of the famous Snowdon horseshoe.

Llynau Mymbyr, near Capel Curig

Llynau Mymbyr, near Capel Curig

Llynua Mymbyr and the Snowdon range

Llynua Mymbyr and the Snowdon range

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It was a bright, dry morning this morning, but windy. Anyway, as we’ve had so few dry days recently I decided it was time to get out, and so I headed up into the hills.


 

 

 

 

 

 

From Cefn Cyfarwydd I had a great view down to Llyn Crafnant nestled in the hills of the Carneddau. It’s a wonderful view so it’s a shame the weather is so poor again.

By the time I’d got up here the cloud kept rolling down the hills and the rain kept coming too. So I headed down to Llyn Crafnant, hoping to find Blackberries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well I found Blackberries, but they weren’t black! Unfortunately I doubt if they will ripen now, and it just goes to show what a horrible, dull, wet summer we’ve had.

 

I looked for Rowan berries too, but they just aren’t there! These trees should be full of berries now, Rowan trees look scarlet at this time of year because they are so full of berries. These two had just a few small ones.

It’s going to be a hard winter for wildlife and foragers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This photo is here just because I liked the bright red standing out in a drab, dying hedgerow.

I’m not sure what this fungus is called, but I was always told to leave bright red ones alone, so I did!

 

It wasn’t the most pleasant day to be out. The wind was stronger than ever up in the hills and the rain was coming and going all the time, so after about three hours I decided it was time to head home, empty handed!

 

 

 

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