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Posts Tagged ‘llandudno’

For various reasons I haven’t been out much lately so to keep things ticking over here are a few photo’s that I haven’t used on previous posts. There is no theme and they don’t appear in any particular order. I hope you enjoy.

Aber falls from down the valley. 29 May 2008

Rhaeadr bach from a distance. 28 August 2008.

Wild ponies in the hills. 28 August 2008.

Autumn colour near Capel Curig. 24 October 2008.



Patches of autumn sunlight at Llyn Ogwen. 24 october 2008.

Bala steam railway. 20 July 2009.

Trees on the shore of Llyn Tegid. 20 July 2009.

Afon Lledr at Dolwyddelan. 13 May 2008.

The frozen Afon Lledr. 7 January 2009

View across Conwy Bay from Great Orme. 14 october 2008.

Llandudno and the sweeping curve of the bay from Great Orme. 22 Sept 2009.

Monument to commemotate the bard Taliesin at Llyn Geirionydd. 19 July 2009.

Tu hwnt i'r bont (Beyond the bridge), Llanrwst. 20 July 2008.

Reflections on Llyn Crafnant. 10 December 2009.

Llyn Dinas. 16 March 2009.

Llyn Crafnant. 4 June 2008.

Llyn Nantlle Uchaf. 16 March 2009.

Flooded car park and fields beyond, Llanrwst. 19 November 2009.

Flooded fields at Capel Curig. 19 November 2009.

Flooded fields near Llanrwst. 19 November 2009.

Flooded fields near Trefriw. 19 November 2009.

Wind and rain at Llynau Mymbyr. 19 November 2009.

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Anytime is a good time to visit north Wales.

Last winter was the hardest for many years, but there were some magical views in the valleys and the mountains.

Autumn is full of wonderful colours.

Spring though, has to be my favourite time; as fresh green leaves start to appear on the trees and flowers start to bloom.

There is a limit to how much I can put into one post, but I hope it gives a taster of how wonderful springtime is around north Wales.

Betws y Coed is a favourite place of artists, walkers and climbers. There is a lovely walk along the river banks, and on the day these photos were taken the weather was wonderful.

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

Afon Conwy at Betws y Coed, 13 April 2009

I have already written a post on Llyn Crafnant, on 23 feb 2009, so I won’t go into more detail here. I will say though that Llyn Crafnant is wonderful at any time of the year. This was a lovely spring day with blossom on some of the bushes and trees just starting to come into leaf.

Spring at Llyn Crafnant, 18 April 2009

There is not much to say about this photo. Bluebells mean spring, and they were in profusion this year. The photo was taken near Trefriw in the Conwy valley on 30th. April 2009.

Bluebells in the Conwy valley, 30 Apr 2009

Nant y Coed is a lovely wooded valley near Llanfairfechan. It was once described as “the loveliest sylvan rock and river scenery in Wales”, and I certainly wouldn’t argue with that description.

Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009


Blue bells at Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

Blue bells at Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

A sun-dappled path, 7 May 2009

A sun-dappled path through Nant y Coed, 7 May 2009

The Isle of Anglesey is a great place to visit. South Stack, not far from Holyhead is a nature reserve. It’s a place to see Puffins, Razorbills and Guillemots as well as the Chough, which nests here.

Walking through the heathland and farmland along the cliff tops you hear the Skylark singing. Not a common sound these days. These photos were taken on 31st. May 2009.

South Stack, Anglesey, June 2009

Razorbills and Guillemots perch on narrow ledges, 31 May 2009

Razorbills and Guillemots perch on narrow ledges, 31 May 2009

Lots of spring colours, 12 May 2009

Lots of spring colours, 12 May 20

I did a post on Bodnant gardens on 14 May 2009, but with all the spring colours there I had to put a couple of photos here, just to tempt you.

Colours in The Dell, 12 May 2009

Colours in The Dell, 12 May 2009


Fairy Glen is just   outside of Betws y Coed and is well worth a visit.

A walk down into the gorge is a must, and then a walk back up, along the top and then gently down to walk along the Afon Conwy.

The black Zwartble sheep are on the farmland which leads to Fairy Glen.

Fairy Glen, Betws y Coed, 3 May 2009


Zwartbles sheep & lambs, 3 May 2009

Zwartbles sheep & lambs, 3 May 2009


Llandudno’s Victorian Extravaganza is held over 3 days of the May Bank Holiday.

It was a beautiful day on the Saturday this year (the Sunday too, but Monday was not as good) and I ended up getting sunburnt!

I did a post on the Extravaganza on 8 May 2009 so this is just a taster.

Fairground rides on the main shopping street, 2 May 2009

Fairground rides on the main shopping street, 2 May 2009

Canada goose with goslings, Conwy, 29 May 2009

Canada goose with goslings, Conwy, 29 May 2009

Birds are every where during spring. Lots of summer migrants have arrived and everywhere you go you can hear bird song.

Not all our birds are little brown jobs either, we have plenty of colourful ones too.

Stonechat near Aber falls, 28 May 2008

Stonechat near Aber falls, 28 May 2008

Chaffinch on Anglesey, 21 May 2008

Chaffinch on Anglesey, 21 May 2008

Greenfinch at Conwy, 29 May 2008

Greenfinch at Conwy, 29 May 2008

Oystercatcher chick at Conwy, 30 May 2008

Oystercatcher chick at Conwy, 30 May 2008

Oystercatcher with a chick, 28 May 2009

Oystercatcher with a chick, 28 May 2009

Aber falls, 29 May 2008

Aber falls, 29 May 2008

Visit the Aber falls, it’s a great day out.

Near the village of Abergwyngregyn, the falls are reached after a gentle walk through pastures and woodland. The valley is now a nature reserve.

It was here that I heard my first Cuckoo of the year, last year.

The fall’s longest single drop is about 115ft.

As it’s spring I thought I’d end with some spring flowers.

Gorse, April 2008

Gorse, April 2008

Wild Primroses on Anglesey, May 21 2008

Wild Primroses on Anglesey, May 21 2008

Bee on a flower, Conwy, 28 May 2008

Bee on a flower, Conwy, 28 May 2008

Common centaury at South Stack

Common centaury at South Stack

Birds foot trefoil, Conwy, 28 May 2008

Birds foot trefoil, Conwy, 28 May 2008

I could have found much more to put in here but that will have to do for now. Why not visit north Wales and do some exploring for yourself.

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The Llandudno Victorian Extravaganza is held over the 3 days of the May Bank Holiday.

 

It’s a great family day out, especially when the weather is as good as it was on the Saturday this year.

 

A parade is held each day with bands, Victorian dress, traction engines and vintage transport. The whole of the main shopping street is closed off (asare many of the streets off), for fairground rides, stalls and entertainment.

 

I’ll let the pictures do most of the talking.

 

One of the marching bands.

One of the marching bands.

 

 

This is just one of the bands, there are a number of others, including one from Llandudnos’ twin town in France.

 

 

 

 

Parade 2, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 

 

Parade 4, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 There are lots of wonderful Victorian costumes to be seen.

 

 

Parade 5, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 

Traction engine 2, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 

Traction engine 4, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 

Traction engine 6, 2 May 09

 

 

 

Vintage 1, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 

 

Vintage 2, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 

 

Vintage 3, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 

 

Vintage 6, 2 May 09

 

 

 

Vintage 8, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 

Vintage 9, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 

 

Crowds on the promenade.

Crowds on the promenade.

 

On the promenade

On the promenade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fun for all the family.

Fun for all the family.

 

 

 

 

 

Fairground 3, 2 May 09

 

 

 

 

 

All the fun of the fair along the main shopping street.

All the fun of the fair along the main shopping street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crowds along the main street with the Great Orme in the background, and a wonderful blue sky.

 

 

The Ghurkas still need our support.

The Ghurkas still need our support.

 

 

 

 

Don’t forget that the Ghurkas still need our support, the battle isn’t won yet.

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As I wrote in my post of the 3rd December, the huge Gwynt-y-Môr has been given the go-ahead by the Government.

Now, more protests are planned. The protest group Save Our Scenery (SOS) is launching a fighting fund, and a seminar is to be held at Llandudno town hall on December 14th. David Bellamy and Dr Mike Hall will both be on the platform.

SOS secretary, Mike Pritchard said, “This is devastating news but we’re not going to take it lying down”. SOS chairman John Lawson-Reay added, “We have fought for three years to get the Government to see sense and we’re not giving up now”.

The windfarm will be built 10 miles out of Llandudno Bay, but Llandudno Hospitality Association is also opposed to the scheme. Others opposing it are Aberconwy AM Gareth Jones and Clwyd West AM Darren Millar.

The project has the backing of the World Wildlife Fund, however, and a spokesman said, “We need more projects such as Gwynt-y-Môr to help reduce our carbon emissions”.

Whilst I agree that the Government should not have ridden rough-shod over the majority wish for a public enquiry, I do wonder where these badly needed windfarms are going to be located. I’m sure I can’t be in a minority in realising that we need these alternative forms of energy, so where can they be located, if not 10 miles off the coast? They have to go somewhere.

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Approval has been given for the building of a huge wind farm off of the coast at Llandudno. The 250 turbines of the Gwynt y Môr will make this wind farm one of the biggest in the world.

The Welsh assembly had requested that a public enquiry be held, not least beacause of the historic nature of Llandudno and the surrounding environment.

The Wind farm has been approved by the Department of Energy and Climate Change without a public enquiry, however.

 John Lawson-Reay, chairman of Save our Scenery, who campaigned against the wind farm, said he was “shattered” by the scheme’s go-ahead.

“Tourism is the only major industry in Wales basically,” he said.

“Llandudno is the queen of Welsh resorts, as has been often said, and we think and we believe and the views we get from visitors we speak to is that the scenery is the primary number one reason for people coming here.

“They want to get away from industrial areas.”

Gwynt y Môr is the latest wind farm to be approved off the north Wales coast.

North Hoyle, which has 30 turbines and Burbo, which has 25 turbines, are already up and running, while Rhyl Flats, with its 25 turbines, is into the latter half of its construction phase. 

The Welsh assembly Government is now urging businesses to capitalise on the economic opportunities that will arise.

Should a public enquiry have been held? There has been a lot of local opposition, is this another example of the UK Government steam-rolling over the wishes of the people?

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/north_west/7762242.stm

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Penmorfa is (or was) the summer and Christmas holiday home of the Liddell family. Alice Liddell was the girl for whom Lewis Carrol wrote “Alice’s adventures in Wonderland” and “Alice through the looking-glass”.

The family first visited Llandudno in 1861 and Alice’s father then bought a plot of land at the bottom of the Great Orme, and built Penmorfa.

Much later the building was extended and used as a hotel, reverting to it’s original name again in 2002. Unfortunately the hotel closed down in 2006 

Penmorfa in all it's glory.

 

Conwy County Borough Council have Penmorfa as part of the Llandudno Town Trail…….but they have allowed developers to pull the building down!

 

 

 

 

 

Penmorfa, Llandudno

 

 The developers were supposed to keep the original  part of the building (seen here in July 2008), but then  said that it was unsafe and needed to be demolished.

 

 Protests were held, as this is an historic building and  important to the town.

 But the councillors, those representatives of the  people, allowed the demolition.

 

 

Penmorfa demolished

 

 

Today (21 November 2008) this is all that remains of an historic building and tourist attraction.

 

Shame on Conwy County Borough Council for allowing this to happen.

 

Llandudno is called “The Queen of resorts”, and relies heavily on tourism. Unfortunately the Council don’t seem to be very active in this area. 

The white rabbit monument

 

 

 About 100 metres from Penmorfa is the White  Rabbit monument, along with one of the council’s  information boards about Alice, Penmorfa and the  White Rabbit.

 

 

 

 

The damaged white rabbit

 

 

The monument was erected in 1933, but as can be seen in the photo taken today, the ear is missing and there is other damage.

 

 

When is Conwy Council going to pay attention to it’s tourist attractions?

 

The dilapidated shelter, West Shore

 

 

  Just a little further along the West shore is  this lovely shelter, but again, it is damaged.  Broken windows and tatty paint work spoil  what should be one of the centre-pieces of  the West Shore.

 

 What is the Council doing? Very little  it  seems.

The derelict site of the Pier Pavilion, Llandudno

 

 

And then into town, and the iconic Grand Hotel and the Victorian Pier.

This derelict site is what greets you as you walk to the Grand Hotel, the site of the old Pier Pavilion. The theatre was last used in 1990, and in 1994 was destroyed by fire.

The derelict site of the Pier Pavilion, Llandudno

 

 

 What a waste of a prime site in a tourist resort. 

 

 The current owner is apparently a Worcester business man,  but surely there must be some action the Council can take.

 Come on Conwy Count Borough Council, the town  needs  some action, from you.

The Pier Pavilion in it's heyday

 

 

 

The Pier Pavilion in it’s heyday. 


Stop the rot you councillors, there is much more I can write about if you don’t.

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The Great Orme, or Pen-y-Gogarth in Welsh, rises up out of the sea and reaches a height of 679 feet. The name Orme originates from the Viking and means serpent; it is thought that to the Vikings it looked like a serpent rising from the sea.

It is a wonderful place to visit, for great views, history or wildlife, and is designates as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and Heritage coast. There is far to much to cover on one blog, so this is an introduction to the fantastic Great Orme

 

  This is the Great Orme seen from Anglesey. It’s easy to see    why the Vikings may have thought it was a serpent.

 The Victorian sea-side resort of Llandudno lies mainly in the  low land to the right of the Great Orme.

 

 


 

 

 

The Great Orme with Llandudno nestling beneath it. 

 


 

 

 

  There are a number of ways up to the summit of the   Great Orme. You can walk (if you’re fit), drive, take a   cable car or the tramway.

 

  The trams run from town, at the side of the road for   most of the way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The cable car is about a mile long and is the longest in Britain.

 

More details on both the cable car and tramway on the next Great Orme post.

 

 

 

 

 

  There are wonderful views (on clear days)    from high on the Great Orme. This is the  view across the Conwy estuary and down the  Menai Strait.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the other end you get a view of Llandudno, it’s bay and pier. In the foreground is part of the dry ski slope and toboggan run.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  A view of the cliffs from near St. Tudnos church.    Marine Drive can be seen running around the cliffs.  This is a scenic drive which runs all the way around.

 


 

 

 

The tiny church of Saint Tudno nestles in a hollow on the Northern side of the Great Orme. The church was built in the 12th. century, on a 6th. century christian site.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bronze-age Copper mines are not far from the road from the town to the summit. There is a visitor centre and tours of the mines can be taken.

 

 

 

 


 

 A standing stone near to the copper mines, another reminder  of early occupation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The remains of medieval settlemets and field patterns can still be seen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The summit complex has served as a hotel,  golf club and as a radar station during WW2.  It was bought by boxing champion Randolph  Turpin in the 1950’s. he ran it as a pub and  held exhibhition bouts in the grounds.

 It is now a welcome stop for visitors, with  it’s bar, cafe and souvenir shop. Nearby is  the Great Orme visitor centre, tramway  station and cable car station.

 

 

 

A pair of Kashmir goats were introduced in Victorian times. There are now about 150 of the goats roaming wild around the headland.

 

 

I hope to be adding further posts about the Great Orme in the near future, it’s such a fascinating place to visit.

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